Unlike Anything Else

boat2After reconciling himself to the actual ocean crossing and seeking ore to make tools, Nephi’s next step was to commence building the worthy vessel that would convey his entire family across the deep water to an entirely different life.  In moments of uncertainty it is nice to fall back on the familiar but Nephi’s way forward would be anything but familiar.  He says that as he began building the ship he did not build it “after the manner of men” but rather was instructed by the Lord on how it should be pieced together.  I think this part of the story strikes at the heart of the living that we all do each day.  When we realize that we are on the shores of an ocean  we’d like some sort of blueprint for the boat that will take us safely across foreign waters but often God asks us to trust Him as He helps us to build our own curious ship.  Like Nephi’s, your vessel may not look anything like ships you’ve see and you may not understand why certain things need be a part of it but oftentimes the wisdom of the form is revealed over time.   As Nephi’s boat took shape he was ridiculed by his brothers for the unfamiliar design of his ship.  In those moments where doubt was flung at him from many angles, he was invited to dive into deeper attunement with heaven and trust the revelation that he was receiving.  Those, my friends, are the formative moments, where we own our own architecture with God.  And the potential result of those brave moments, if we stick with the building, is a kind of soul-deep knowing that influences everything else we create with Him.

Take Action: If, in your occasions of forward progress, you have times where the deafening voices around you crowd out the whisperings of intuition and inspiration, take note and find a few quiet moments to re-align with Heaven and then tuck those moments of connection deep in your soul, stand tall and walk confidently forward knowing that you and God are building something that is strong and seaworthy to carry you purposefully across the oceans you face.

Overwhelming Ocean Crossings

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There was a man named Nephi (pronounced Knee-Fye) who was working to take his family to a safe place where they could live peacefully and worship God.  He sought heaven’s guidance as he journeyed toward this place and God promised him that he would find it.  At one point, after wandering with both his immediate and extended family for quite some time he came to water.  Not just a small bit of water but an ocean.  Like many of us do when faced with a seemingly insurmountable obstacle to our forward progress, Nephi stops for a while, camping at the side of this ocean.  When Nephi comes to terms with the reality that an ocean crossing is in his future he does what faithful people do, he asks God to help him figure out how to make it happen.  He’s not a boater or shipbuilder, he hasn’t brought tools or sails or anything to make this job the least bit easier. But he is a believer and in this instance, like in any instance, that is enough.  He shows his willing (maybe resigned belief) in the next question he asks God which is “Where can I go to find ore to make tools?”  Note that he didn’t ask for a boat.  So often I ask God to deliver a boat to get me across the oceans I face.  But the more oceans I cross with His guidance the more I treasure the grace-full way He teaches me to build boats.  In my experience He is always willing to answer prayers for tools once we cultivate a willingness to build the boat.

Take Action: Are there any tools you need to get somewhere in your life?  Tools that will help you face a daunting obstacle?  Tools that will enable you to move out of a stuck place?   I know God loves us and wants to bless us.  With that in mind, identify what it is you need in order to make forward progress and then ask him to help you find the tools (people, resources, education, wisdom, experience) to make it happen.  Then look earnestly for those things and you will find them.

AIP defined

get well soon

I’ve gotten a lot of questions lately about the Autoimmune Protocol I followed for two years to put Hashimoto’s into remission.  When I began the AIP I knew it as the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol which was put together by Sarah Ballantyne, PhD.  It stood out to me amidst all the other healing protocols for these reasons:

  1. Sarah Ballantyne is a mom so presumably her ideas would fit a family lifestyle.
  2. She holds a PhD in Immunology and she could explain fairly complex biology in clear and straightforward ways.
  3. She pulled in pieces of research and information that seemed connected to her autoimmune diseases and built a protocol around it that other people had success with.  One of her initial followers, Mickey Trescott, had reversed Hashimotos using the protocol.
  4. The protocol bore some resemblance to the initial diet my endocrinologist had me try to level my blood sugar and get some energy coursing through me.

After seeking to follow the protocol for 18 months I had normal thyroid numbers and much better self care.  I was off my Synthroid medication.  Now I could call it the Almost Impossible Program.  Almost impossible because most people that I talked to (doctors, friends, family) couldn’t believe I was doing it (especially for so long) nor could they believe it would actually deliver results.  Despite the fact that it was one of the hardest things I’ve ever done, I’m really grateful I invested time, resources and energy into learning more about how to live well in this body of mine.

Learning to Juggle Life

On Three Kings Day my daughter Jessica received three soft juggling balls in her shoes along with an instruction sheet on the art of juggling.  As with any new endeavor, she took to it with great enthusiasm, confidently tossing all three balls in the air expecting to be able to keep them aloft with relative ease.  After all, people make it look easy all the time.  After a few attempts she got frustrated so we pulled out the instruction sheet which directed her to  practice juggling with only two balls and to add the third only when two could be consistently kept airborne.  Though juggling two balls doesn’t seem overly complex, there is a recommended way to keep the balls moving so as to easily incorporate a third.  Without practice with the rhythm it’s hard to smoothly transition to an additional item to juggle.

I have thought a lot about juggling this week as I try to keep myself and my family aloft while tossing a business into the mix.  When we’re faced with an unexpected or new endeavor life invites us to practice juggling more than we’re used to.  Initially it can feel overwhelming and frustrating, especially if other people seem to have a handle on it and we find ourselves with not one but maybe all three balls falling to the ground despite our frantically flailing arms.  I’m a firm believer in practice and respect for growth.  I may not be able to juggle those three things proficiently now but with patience and a focus on my established rhythms I think I can get there.  You can too, with whatever you’re trying to juggle in your life.  In the meantime, if you see me dropping the ball just give me an encouraging smile.

Lessons in Supply & Demand

As I wrapped up work with most of my “seasonal refresh” clients this week, I started to contact some of the people who wanted landscape consultations.  It’s been an interesting process to see what the market will bear by offering different prices to people.  I determined relatively early (like Day 2) that running a business at a $20/hr rate is not viable because once I’m up and running, sales tax, payroll tax and overhead costs not to mention supplies, scheduling and job preparation will eat a large chunk of that amount and I will basically end up volunteering.   Now I volunteer quite a bit each week but I’m trying to learn more about business and by definition businesses earn a profit.

I’ve been more busy than I want to be at $20 but so far I haven’t had very many people take me up on my consultation and landscape design offers which, depending on what they wanted, ranged anywhere from $40 (for a troubleshooting consultation to address remediation for a specific area of the yard/garden) to $300 (for a landscape review, a full front and backyard design plan, 2 revisions, a full plant list with sources, phased and detailed installation instructions and an HOA ACC submittal packet).  I’m looking for that sweet spot, the one where I have enough work to occupy the hours I want to devote to this each week at a price that’s worth it for me to spend time doing the work (supply) and where the work I do adds enough value that the individual is willing to pay it (demand).

I have had quite a few people ask me to quote other seasonal clean-up work (for the backyard or a friend or neighbor) and my little family crew and I have been doing that for reasonable and profitable rates.  I’m wondering if seasonal maintenance is something people are more interested in in my neighborhood than well-designed landscapes.  I’m grateful I had so many people interested because I’ve been able to conduct a ton of market research these last few weeks.  Here’s to a deepening understanding of economics!

Things I learned my first week in business

So it turns out when you accidentally start a business there are quite a few things you have to learn really quickly.  Here are a few tidbits I picked up this week:

Important Acronyms to know: 

FEIN (Federal Employer Identification Number)

LLC (Limited Liability Company)

JSN (Just say no…especially important when people ask you to do something you REALLY don’t know how to do-like remove a tree)

TAGQ (Pronounced tah-gque, “That’s a good question”….turns out there are quite a few of these coming my way)

Live & Learn

Don’t apply for your Federal EIN number before your LLC paperwork confirmation comes back.  Because maybe the name you wanted is taken (it turns out checking domain names and the federal EIN site isn’t the same thing as checking in with the State Comptroller.  Who doesn’t buy their domain name when they file their business paperwork!?) and then you have to file a bunch more paperwork to make your EIN Number match your LLC name.

Applying for insurance when your previous experience is a volunteer apprenticeship and the person you worked with is now deceased (but lives on in everything you put in the ground) presents an interesting series of hoops to jump through.  Additionally, submitting a resume, payroll estimates and gross revenue estimates is challenging when you’ve been in business for 2.5 weeks.  But having insurance to bring in jobs and earn that revenue seems like the responsible way to operate.  So much for the advice in $100 Startup to just try something out and see if it works, write the business plan later.

Sometimes things work out and fall into place.  Sometimes they don’t.  Ritchie and I have been trying to figure out a way to create a revenue stream that we could use for humanitarian endeavors.  We’ve sorted through and planned a few different things now but kept hitting roadblocks.  Then this opportunity just kind of opened up and I feel hopeful and confident that Esteban, our newly-sponsored high school student training to be an Agricultural Technician will give this whole endeavor added meaning, motivation and success.   It’s a blessing to use our freedom, gifts, experiences, time and opportunities to empower others.  Until next time, happy landscaping!

The Accidental Entrepreneur or The time I tried to buy an ink cartridge and ended up starting a business.

img_6381A week and a half ago, after setting the intention to be more budget-conscious I found myself needing a black ink cartridge.  Those things are expensive and I didn’t have enough left in my weekly home management budget to buy one.  I could’ve used money from another account or my savings and it would’ve been fine but I tend to do that a lot so I decided to stick to my budget and get creative.  I printed everything in blue ink instead of black for a while but as the week wore on this strategy got increasingly frustrating and I found myself with a list of “things to print when I get an ink cartridge.”  I needed a black ink cartridge to live efficiently.  I decided I could try to earn one.  Now I’m a little rusty when it comes to earning money since I’ve been staying home with Jessica (and preparing for Jessica and trying to conceive Jessica) for the past 11 years and I’m particular about the time I commit outside our home.  So I decided to post a message on my community Facebook group offering to cut back the myriad brown and crunchy frozen plants in people’s front yards.  I listed my qualifications (Master Gardener Training, Landscape Design practice/consulting) as well as my availability (3 spots on Thursday) and price ($20).  I hoped 3 people would want to take me up on my offer so I could buy my ink cartridge and get on with my life.  In less than 3 minutes I had 3 customers and I was elated.  Within 8 minutes I had 5 customers so I said I could do 2 front yards on Friday too (Hey, I thought, I can also buy the essential oil I’ve been needing to replenish).  By the end of the night I had about 20 messages and by the next morning I was up to 30.  The following week saw an additional 10 people added to my list, each wanting a different service (tree pruning, lawn consultation, landscape design, winter clean-up).  As I met with different neighbors I realized that I inadvertently stumbled into a ready market for my landscape love.  I’ve worked hard, I’ve made some mistakes, I’ve learned a lot, I’ve gotten dirty, I bought a hedge-trimmer and wielded it with pride (because I spent 60 hand-cramping minutes cutting back ornamental grass with hand pruners and that hedge trimmer gets the job done in less than a minute!).  So this past week I filed papers with the Texas State Comptroller to officially establish Beautiful Village Landscaping LLC.  Now proudly (and humbly) operating in Bulverde Village.

Reverse Migration

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Learning about backstrap weaving in the village of Nuevo San Idelfonso.

 

This NYT lens piece resonated with me.  During our trip to Guatemala last year we frequently heard the words  “Mi esposo se fue” or “My husband went.”  When you see the poverty, the extreme living conditions, you understand.  The reason we went to Guatemala was to empower people and improve conditions there so that the need to immigrate would be less.  We wanted to share the goodness, the strength and the hope that America can offer in a place that could use some support.  We wanted to strengthen and support the already beautiful Guatemalan culture and people so that both could flourish more fully and bless all of us with their strength.   We chose Guatemala because my husband Ritchie has a background there from his two year church mission and we love the people and culture.  We didn’t do it from a place of superiority but from a place of gratitude.  We thought  “We are presently recipients of freedom, beauty, and opportunity and if any of it could be useful to you we will happily share it.”  If we all did this, even in just small ways, the world would be such a different place.

Take action: 

1) Identify a country where you could make a difference.   It could be a place you dream of visiting, a place you have experience with or a place you’re curious about.  We chose one that was easy to get to from our home here in Texas.  Ultimately it’s the land and the people you are connecting with.

2) Do a google search for a person or organization doing empowering work in that place and join their Facebook page or email list.  It could be a local from the country you’re interested in or a globally-minded person in your country.  Once you begin to understand what they do, brainstorm skills you have that could be useful to the organization.  Offer those skills and a bit of your time and let me know what happens.

Learn by living

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Our “plancha” ride

When Ritchie, Jessica and I set out for Guatemala last year we knew that we were undertaking some things we’d never done before and there was a good chance we were going to make mistakes as we immersed ourselves in experiences with new places, cultures and people.  We committed that instead of getting frustrated when something didn’t quite go the way we planned we’d remind each other to “Live and Learn.”  The strategy worked well for us and sometimes the mistakes were funny like when I told our local guide I needed to take a griddle (plancha) instead of a boat (barco).  Other times they were more serious like when a flight got cancelled and we didn’t know that the large-group-tour-guide was running to the reservation counter because when you’re near the end of the line you wait for the shuttle for an additional hour AND get the last available hotel room on the outskirts of the city AND eat your “free” dinner with your six year old asleep in your lap around 10:30 pm.  Nevertheless the practice of saying “live and learn” at each misstep helped us to laugh and enjoy our adventure.  Over the past year we’ve continued to use this mantra in our home, work and travels and it’s lightened things up nearly every time. So next time you goof something up, just be curious about what you could learn from the experience.  It makes a world of difference.

Do Good Now

As I gardened at my local LDS temple this morning, I found this tiny sprouting acorn amidst an array of other acorns who had yet to take the leap from acorn to sprout.  Wanting to show it to Jessica, I kept it moist and brought it home.  Acorns serve as seasonal symbols of nature’s steady reminder that small things proceed very large things.  A timely application for that wisdom is the awareness that big changes grow from small decisions.  So today, make it a point to do something good.  Don’t wait until tomorrow, don’t talk yourself out of it.  Just do something good today because you never know what may stem from your actions.